Created for Philip Adams' company Balletlab, ORIGAMI was Anastasia La Fey's first foray into costume for dance.

The particularity of this work provided her a unique avenue to further investigate a long existant fascination with the structural properties and articulation of the fold.

Extending further from her previous use of japanese textiles and applications of origami techniques in her couture works, Anastasia La Fey responded both to Adams' intricate choreography, which focused on the concept of folding and unfolding, and to the work-specific folding set designed by BURO architects.

 

A nine month period of research development and work-in-progress experimentation, through applications in both paper and cloth, realised the finished design and make, utilising vintage and antique Japanese textiles, of twenty two intricately folded, hand-crafted sculptural costumes for eight dancers.

Described by reviewers as "striking", "intricately ornamental", "beautifully erotic" and as "having the ability to appear as structural samurai armoury one moment and a pile of laundry the next", her debut work for dance so impressed as to be chosen to feature in The Victorian Arts Centre's exhibition Seamless - Costume for Dance, alongside works by renowned Australian designers Kenneth Rowell, Jennifer Irwin, Akira Isogawa and more.

 IKEBANA - antique japanese silk l cotton thread l 2006

IKEBANA - antique japanese silk l cotton thread l 2006

 BUSTLE - antique japanese silk l cotton l cotton thread l 2006

BUSTLE - antique japanese silk l cotton l cotton thread l 2006